Jump to content

23. Specialty Beer- Piwa specjalne


Makaron
 Share

Recommended Posts

This is explicitly a catch-all category for any beer that does not fit into an existing style category. No beer is ever ?out of style? in this category, unless it fits elsewhere.

The category is intended for any type of beer, including the following techniques or ingredients:

Unusual techniques (e.g., steinbier, ice/eis beers)

Unusual fermentables (e.g., maple syrup, honey, molasses, sorghum)

Unusual adjuncts (e.g., oats, rye, buckwheat, potatoes)

Combinations of other style categories (e.g., India Brown Ale, fruit-and-spice beers, smoked spiced beers)

Out-of-style variations of existing styles (e.g., low alcohol versions of other styles, extra-hoppy beers, ?imperial? strength beers)

Historical, traditional or indigenous beers (e.g., Louvain Peetermann, Sahti, vatted Porter with Brettanomyces, Colonial Spruce or Juniper beers, Kvass, Grätzer)

American-style interpretations of European styles (e.g., hoppier, stronger, or ale versions of lagers) or other variants of traditional styles

Clones of specific commercial beers that aren?t good representations of existing styles

Any experimental beer that a brewer creates, including any beer that simply does not evaluate well against existing style definitions

This category can also be used as an ?incubator? for any minor world beer style (other than Belgians) for which there is currently no BJCP category. If sufficient interest exists, some of these minor styles might be promoted to full styles in the future. Some styles that fall into this grouping include:

Honey Beers (not Braggots)

Wiess (cloudy, young Kölsch)

Sticke Altbier

Münster Altbier

Imperial Porter

Classic American Cream Ale

Czech Dark Lager

English Pale Mild

Scottish 90/-

American Stock Ale

English Strong Ale

Non-alcoholic ?Beer?

Kellerbier

Malt Liquor

Australian Sparkling Ale

Imperial/Double Red Ale

Imperial/Double Brown Ale

Rye IPA

Dark American Wheat/Rye

Note that certain other specialty categories exist in the guidelines. Belgian Specialties or clones of specific Belgian beers should be entered in Category 16E. Christmas-type beers should be entered in Category 21B (unless they are Belgian Christmas-type beers; these should be entered in 16E). Beers with only one type of fruit, spice, herbs, vegetables, or smoke should be entered in Categories 20-22. Specialty meads or ciders should be entered in their respective categories (26C for meads, 28D for ciders).

 

23. Specialty Beer

 

Aroma: The character of the stated specialty ingredient or nature should be evident in the aroma, but harmonious with the other components (yet not totally overpowering them). Overall the aroma should be a pleasant combination of malt, hops and the featured specialty ingredient or nature as appropriate to the specific type of beer being presented. The individual character of special ingredients and processes may not always be identifiable when used in combination. If a classic style base beer is specified then the characteristics of that classic style should be noticeable. Note, however, that classic styles will have a different impression when brewed with unusual ingredients, additives or processes. The typical aroma components of classic beer styles (particularly hops) may be intentionally subdued to allow the special ingredients or nature to be more apparent.

Appearance: Appearance should be appropriate to the base beer being presented and will vary depending on the base beer (if declared). Note that unusual ingredients or processes may affect the appearance so that the result is quite different from the declared base style. Some ingredients may add color (including to the head), and may affect head formation and retention.

Flavor: As with aroma, the distinctive flavor character associated with the stated specialty nature should be noticeable, and may range in intensity from subtle to aggressive. The marriage of specialty ingredients or nature with the underlying beer should be harmonious, and the specialty character should not seem artificial and/or totally overpowering. Hop bitterness, flavor, malt flavors, alcohol content, and fermentation by-products, such as esters or diacetyl, should be appropriate to the base beer (if declared) and be well-integrated with the distinctive specialty flavors present. Some ingredients may add tartness, sweetness, or other flavor by-products. Remember that fruit and sugar adjuncts generally add flavor and not excessive sweetness to beer. The sugary adjuncts, as well as sugar found in fruit, are usually fully fermented and contribute to a lighter flavor profile and a drier finish than might be expected for the declared base style. The individual character of special ingredients and processes may not always be identifiable when used in combination. If a classic style base beer is specified then the characteristics of that classic style should be noticeable. Note, however, that classic styles will have a different impression when brewed with unusual ingredients, additives or processes. Note that these components (especially hops) may be intentionally subdued to allow the specialty character to come through in the final presentation.

Mouthfeel: Mouthfeel may vary depending on the base beer selected and as appropriate to that base beer (if declared). Body and carbonation levels should be appropriate to the base beer style being presented. Unusual ingredients or processes may affect the mouthfeel so that the result is quite different from the declared base style.

 

Overall Impression: A harmonious marriage of ingredients, processes and beer. The key attributes of the underlying style (if declared) will be atypical due to the addition of special ingredients or techniques; do not expect the base beer to taste the same as the unadulterated version. Judge the beer based on the pleasantness and harmony of the resulting combination. The overall uniqueness of the process, ingredients used, and creativity should be considered. The overall rating of the beer depends heavily on the inherently subjective assessment of distinctiveness and drinkability.

 

Base Style: THE BREWER MAY SPECIFY AN UNDERLYING BEER STYLE. The base style may be a classic style (i.e., a named subcategory from these Style Guidelines) or a broader characterization (e.g., ?Porter? or ?Brown Ale?). If a base style is declared, the style should be recognizable. The beer should be judged by how well the special ingredient or process complements, enhances, and harmonizes with the underlying style.

 

Comments: Overall harmony and drinkability are the keys to presenting a well-made specialty beer. The distinctive nature of the stated specialty ingredients/methods should complement the original style (if declared) and not totally overwhelm it. The brewer should recognize that some combinations of base beer styles and ingredients or techniques work well together while others do not make palatable combinations. THE BREWER MUST SPECIFY THE ?EXPERIMENTAL NATURE? OF THE BEER (E.G., TYPE OF SPECIAL INGREDIENTS USED, PROCESS UTILIZED OR HISTORICAL STYLE BEING BREWED), OR WHY THE BEER DOESN?T FIT AN ESTABLISHED STYLE. For historical styles or unusual ingredients/techniques that may not be known to all beer judges, the brewer should provide descriptions of the styles, ingredients and/or techniques as an aid to the judges.

 

Vital Statistics:

OG: Varies with base style

IBUs: Varies with base style

FG: Varies with base style

SRM: Varies with base style

ABV: Varies with base style

 

Commercial Examples: Bell?s Rye Stout, Bell?s Eccentric Ale, Samuel Adams Triple Bock and Utopias, Hair of the Dog Adam, Great Alba Scots Pine, Tommyknocker Maple Nut Brown Ale, Great Divide Bee Sting Honey Ale, Stoudt?s Honey Double Mai Bock, Rogue Dad?s Little Helper, Rogue Honey Cream Ale, Dogfish Head India Brown Ale, Zum Uerige Sticke and Doppel Sticke Altbier, Yards Brewing Company General Washington Tavern Porter, Rauchenfels Steinbier, Odells 90 Shilling Ale, Bear Republic Red Rocket Ale, Stone Arrogant Bastard

 

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

 

Ta kategoria wyraźnie grupuje wszystkie kategorie piwa które nie pasują do wyżej wymienionych styli. Żadne piwo nie jest poza stylem w tej kategorii dopóki nie pasuje w innych kategoriach.

Kategoria jest stworzona specjalnie dla jakiegokolwiek typu piwa, składającego się z następujących technik albo surowców:

Nietypowe techniki (np. steinbier, lodowe/eis piwa)

Nietypowe dodatki fermentacyjne (np. syrop klonowy, miód, melasa, sorghum)

Nietypowe dodatki słodowane (np. owies, żyto, gryka, ziemniaki)

Kombinacji innych styli (np. India Brown Ale, owocowe i przyprawowe piwa, wędzone i przyprawowe piwa)

Nie trzymające się stylu odmiany (np. niskoalkoholowe wersje innych styli, mocno chmielone piwa, ?imperialnej? mocy piwa)

Historyczne, tradycyjne albo miejscowe piwa (np. Louvain Peetermann, Sahti, mieszany Porter z drożdżami Brettanomyces, Colonial Spruce albo piwo typu Juniper , Kvass, Grätzer)

Amerykańskie interpretacje styli europejskich (np. bardziej chmielone, mocniejsze albo wersje górnej fermetnacji piwa dolnej fermetnacji) albo różbe wariacje styli tradycyjnych.

Klony albo specyficzne komercyjne piwa, które nie są dobrymi reprezentacjami istniejących styli.

Jakiekolwiek eksperymentane piwa, które są tworem piwowara, włącznie z piwami, które po prostu nie mieszczą sięw istniejącej definicji stylu.

 

Ta kategoria może być również użyta jako ?inkubator? dla każdego mniejszego stylu piwa (inne niż belgisjkie) dla których nie ma obecnie kategorii BJCP. Jeśli odpowiednie zainteresowanie istnieje, niektóre z tych styli mogą być wypromowane do pełnego stylu w przyszłości. Niektóre style, które mieszczą się w tej grupie zawierają:

Piwo miodowe (nie Braggots)

Wiess (mętny, młody Kölsch)

Stricke Altbier

Münster Altbier

Imperial Porter

Classic American Cream Ale

Czech Dark Lager

English Pale Mild

Scottish 90/-

American Stock Ale

English Strong Ale

Bezalkoholowe Piwo

Kellerbier

Malt Liquor ? Liker słodowy

Australian Sparkling Ale

Imperial/Double Red Ale

Imperial/Double Brown Ale

Rye IPA ? Żytni IPA

Dark American Wheat/Rye

 

Zauważ, że konkretne inne kategotrie specjalne istnieją w wytycznych. Belgijskie piwa specjalne albo klony specyficznych piw belgijskich powinny być wystawione w kategorii 16E. Piwa świąteczne powinny być wystawione w kategorii 21B (dopóki nie jest to belgijskie piwo świąteczne, bo te powinno być wystawione w 16E). Piwa z tylko jednym typem owoców, przypraw, ziół, warzyw albo dymu powinny być wystawione w kategoriach 20-22. Specjalne mead (miody pitne) albo cydry powinny być wystawione w ich odpowieniej kategorii (26C dla mead, 28D dla cydrów).

 

 

23. Specialty Beer

Aromat: Charakret użytych surowców specjalnych, albo technik powinno być ewidentnie wyczuwalne w aromacie, ale powinno być harmoniczne wraz z innymi elementami (ale nie powinny kompletnie przysłaniać ich). Ogólny aromat powinien być przyjemną kombinacją słodu, chmielu i użytych specjalnych surowców albo natury, tak aby bylo odpowiednie dla specyfikacji typu piwa, które jest prezentowane. Indywidualny charakter specjalnych surowców i procesów nie zawsze musi być identyfikowalne, jeśli została użyta kombinacja surowców lub/i procesów. Jeśli styl klasyczny piwa bazowego jest określony wtedy cechy tego stylu powinny być wyczuwalne. Zauważ, jednak, że ten styl klasyczny będzie miał inny wyraz, gdy jest uwarzone z nietypowych surowców, dodatków albo procesów. Typowe elementy aromatu klasycznych stylów piwa (w szczególności chmieli) mogą być specjalnie przytłumione aby pozwolić surowcom specjalnym, albo naturze były bardziej zauważalne.

Wygląd: Wygląd powinien być odpowiedni do stylu piwa bazowego, które jest prezentowane i może się różnić w zależności do piwa bazowego (jeśli zadeklarowane). Zauważ, że nietypowe surowce albo procesy mogą mieć wpływ na wygląd, zatem rezultat jest trochę inny od zadeklarowanego stylu bazowego. Niektóre surowce mogą nadać kolor (również pianie), i może mieć wpływ na formowanie się i utrzymanie się piany.

 

Smak: Jak z aromatem, wyraźne cechy smaku związane z określoną naturą specjalnych surowców powinny być zauważalne, i mogą być w przedziale intensywności od subtelnych do agresywnych. Połączenie surowców specjalnych albo natury wraz z piwem bazowym powinno być harmoniczne i cechy specjalne powinny nie wydawać się sztuczne i/albo kompletnie przysłaniające. Goryczka chmielowa, smak, smak słodowy, zawartość alkoholu i produkty uboczne fermentacji, takie jak estry albo diacetyl, powinny być odpowiednie do stylu piwa bazowego (jeśli zadeklarowane) i powinny dobrze zintegrowane wraz z wyraźnym smakiem smaków specjalnych. Niektóre surowce mogą nadać cierpkości, słodkości albo inne smaki uboczne fermentacji. Pamiętaj, że owoce i dodatki cukru mogą nadać smaków i nie nadmierny do smaku piwa. Cukrowe dodatki jak również cukry z owoców są przeważnie w pełni fermentowalne i wpływają na lżejszy profil smakowy i bardziej wytrawny finisz w porównaniu do tego co można się spodziewać w piwie bazowym. Indywidualne cechy surowców specjalnych i procesów nie muszą zawsze być identyfikowalne ,gdy kombinacja różnych składników specjalnych jest użyta. Jeśli klasyczny styl piwa jest określony wtedy cechy tego stylu klasycznego powinny być zauważalne. Zauważ, jednak, że ten styl klasyczny będzie miał inny wyraz, gdy jest uwarzone z nietypowych surowców, dodatków albo procesów. Typowe elementy aromatu klasycznych stylów piwa (w szczególności chmieli) mogą być specjalnie przytłumione aby pozwolić surowcom specjalnym, albo naturze były bardziej zauważalne.

 

Tekstura: Tekstura smaku może się różnić w zależności od piwa bazowego i powinna być odpowiednia (jeśli zadeklarowane). Treściwość i poziom nagazowania powinien być odpowiedni dla piwa bazowego. Nietypowe surowce albo procesy mogą wpłynąć na tektrure smaku, zatem rezultat może być trochę inny od zadeklarowanego stylu bazowego.

 

Ogólne wrażenia: Harmoniczne połączenie surowców, procesów i piwa. Kluczowy atrybut piwa bazowego (jeśli zadeklarowane) będzie zależne od specjalnych dodatków albo technik; nie oczekuj, że piwo będzie smakowało jak wersja nie zmieniona. Oceniaj piwo na podstawie przyjemności smaku, harmonii kombinacji smaków. Ogólna unikalność procesu, surowców użytych i kreatywności piwowara powinna być również brana pod uwagę. Ogólna ocena piwa zależy mocno nierozłącznie z subiektywną oceną odróżniających się cech i ?pijalnością?.

 

Styl bazowy: PIWOWAR MOŻE OKREŚLIĆ PIWO BAZOWE. Piwem bazowym może być klasyczny styl (np nazwy z podkategorii z tego przewodnika) albo szeroki opis uwarzonego piwa (np. ?Porter? albo ?Brown Ale?). Jeśli styl jest zadeklarowany, wtedy ten styl powinien być rozpoznawalny. Piwo powinno być oceniane jak dobrze surowce specjalne albo procesy łączą się, wzacniają i harmonizują ze stylem piwa bazowego.

 

Komentarz: Ogólna harmoniczność i ?pijalność? są kluczem przy prezentacji dobrze uwarzonego piwa specjalnego. Wyraźna natura określonych surowców specjalnych/metod powinny dopełmnić oryginalny styl (jeśli zadeklarowany) i nie powinień całkowicie go przysłonić. Piwowar powinien rozpoznać, że niektóre kombinacje piwa bazowego i surowców albo technik specjalnych współpracuje dobrze, a inne nie tworzą smacznych kombinacji. PIWOWAR MUSI OKREŚLIĆ ?EKSPERYMENTALNĄ NATURE? PIWA (NP. TYP SPECJALNYCH SUROWCÓW, PROCESÓW UŻYTYCH ALBO HISTORYCZNE STYLE). Dla styli historycznych albo nietypowych surowców/technik, które mogą nie być znane jurorom, piwowar powinien udostępnić opis stylu, surowców i/albo technik jako pomoc dla jurorów.

 

Podstawowe informacje:

OG: Zależy od piwa bazowego

IBUs: Zależy od piwa bazowego

FG: Zależy od piwa bazowego

SRM: Zależy od piwa bazowego

ABV: Zależy od piwa bazowego

 

Komercyjne przykłady: Bell?s Rye Stout, Bell?s Eccentric Ale, Samuel Adams Triple Bock and Utopias, Hair of the Dog Adam, Great Alba Scots Pine, Tommyknocker Maple Nut Brown Ale, Great Divide Bee Sting Honey Ale, Stoudt?s Honey Double Mai Bock, Rogue Dad?s Little Helper, Rogue Honey Cream Ale, Dogfish Head India Brown Ale, Zum Uerige Sticke and Doppel Sticke Altbier, Yards Brewing Company General Washington Tavern Porter, Rauchenfels Steinbier, Odells 90 Shilling Ale, Bear Republic Red Rocket Ale, Stone Arrogant Bastard

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.